A Sellout's Samizdat
explore-blog:

Brilliant: Dinah Fried cooks and photographs meals from beloved books — Moby-Dick (above), Little Women, The Catcher in the Rye, Lolita, and more:

Reading and eating are natural companions, and they’ve got a lot in common. Reading is consumption. Eating is consumption. Both are comforting, nourishing, restorative, relaxing, and mostly enjoyable. They can energize you or put you to sleep. Heavy books and heavy meals both require a period of intense digestion. Just as reading great novels can transport you to another time and place, meals — good and bad ones alike — can conjure scenes very far away from your kitchen table. Some of my favorite meals convey stories of origin and tradition; as a voracious reader, I devour my favorite books.

See more here.

explore-blog:

Brilliant: Dinah Fried cooks and photographs meals from beloved booksMoby-Dick (above), Little Women, The Catcher in the Rye, Lolita, and more:

Reading and eating are natural companions, and they’ve got a lot in common. Reading is consumption. Eating is consumption. Both are comforting, nourishing, restorative, relaxing, and mostly enjoyable. They can energize you or put you to sleep. Heavy books and heavy meals both require a period of intense digestion. Just as reading great novels can transport you to another time and place, meals — good and bad ones alike — can conjure scenes very far away from your kitchen table. Some of my favorite meals convey stories of origin and tradition; as a voracious reader, I devour my favorite books.

See more here.

Peter Matthiessen in The New Yorker

newyorker:

Peter Matthiessen, the naturalist and writer, died Saturday at 86. Over the years, he wrote about many of his travels in the magazine. Take a look at some of his pieces: http://nyr.kr/1e9GqvI

Photograph by Ulf Andersen/Getty.

mightyflynn:

Joan Jett, 1977

Sherman Oaks, California

Photos by Brad Elterman via soundsof71

‘Robot’ to write 1 billion stories in 2014 but will you know it when you see it? | Poynter. ⇢

futurejournalismproject:

If you’re a human reporter quaking in your boots this week over news of a Los Angeles Times algorithm that wrote the newspaper’s initial story about an earthquake, you might want to cover your ears for this fact:

Software from Automated Insights will generate about 1 billion stories this year — up from 350 million last year, CEO and founder Robbie Allen told Poynter via phone.

FJP: Here’s a ponderable for you.

A few weeks ago, the New York Post reported that Quinton Ross died. Ross, a former Brooklyn Nets basketball player, didn’t know he was dead and soon let people know he was just fine.

"A couple (relatives) already heard it," Ross told the Associated Press. “They were crying. I mean, it was a tough day, man, mostly for my family and friends… My phone was going crazy. I checked Facebook. Finally, I went on the Internet, and they were saying I was dead. I just couldn’t believe it.”

The original reporter on the story? A robot. Specifically, Wikipedia Live Monitor, created by Google engineer Thomas Steiner.

Slate explains how it happened:

Wikipedia Live Monitor is a news bot designed to detect breaking news events. It does this by listening to the velocity and concurrent edits across 287 language versions of Wikipedia. The theory is that if lots of people are editing Wikipedia pages in different languages about the same event and at the same time, then chances are something big and breaking is going on.

At 3:09 p.m. the bot recognized the apparent death of Quinton Ross (the basketball player) as a breaking news event—there had been eight edits by five editors in three languages. The bot sent a tweet. Twelve minutes later, the page’s information was corrected. But the bot remained silent. No correction. It had shared what it thought was breaking news, and that was that. Like any journalist, these bots can make mistakes.

Quick takeaway: Robots, like the humans that program them, are fallible.

Slower, existential takeaway: “How can we instill journalistic ethics in robot reporters?

As Nicholas Diakopoulos explains in Slate, code transparency is an inadequate part of the answer. More important  is understanding what he calls the “tuning criteria,” or the inherent biases, that are used to make editorial decisions when algorithms direct the news.

Read through for his excellent take.

(Source: futurescope)

Resume Tips You Need to Follow

I’m reviewing a big batch of resumes for two open positions in my department. I have a big “no” pile - mostly full of resumes for people who are unqualified. But many landed in the “no” pile because of:

  • Typos and grammatical errors. “Atention to detail” indeed.
  • Ridiculously outdated information. “Netscape Navigator” should not appear under “Computer Skills.”
  • Information overload. Keep it under 2 pages unless you’re a Nobel Prize Winner.
  • Lack of prioritization. Don’t say everything you’ve ever done in your life. Just say what you’ve done that’s relevant to the job you want. Focus on the big stuff.
  • All activity, no impact. I don’t need a big list of what you did for your past jobs. I need to know the results you achieved.
donthenerd:

I am imagining Neil sitting in his office at The Hayden Planetarium, waiting for the exact moment to tweet this and it’s something I’d do.
What a geek.

donthenerd:

I am imagining Neil sitting in his office at The Hayden Planetarium, waiting for the exact moment to tweet this and it’s something I’d do.

What a geek.

http://mentakingup2muchspaceonthetrain.tumblr.com/post/81700633497/sbspen-wrote-i-fucking-hate-your-blog-you-take ⇢

mentakingup2muchspaceonthetrain:

sbspen wrote:

I fucking hate your blog. You take all the assholes taking up too much space on public transit, filter out anyone who isn’t a man, then use the remaining photos to fuel your misandrist argument. It gives a bad name to real feminism, but none of that matters because you’ve proven…

laughingsquid:

A Beautiful London Street Art Series Featuring the Endangered Birds of Britain

laughingsquid:

A Beautiful London Street Art Series Featuring the Endangered Birds of Britain

@courrtsgee vs @Cool_cat_Cam

anagramatron:



futurejournalismproject:

As Turkey Bans Twitter, Twitter Use Surges
Turkey banned Twitter Thursday night because of “biases" and "systematic character assassinations" it says take place on the network. Namely, that people are sharing audio recordings and other evidence of alleged mass corruption in the Erdogan government.
Despite the ban, or maybe because of it, Twitter use within Turkey just skyrocketed. Via Venture Beat:

After banning Twitter last night, the actions of Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan have failed spectacularly.
Immediately following Turkey’s ban, Twitter issued an SMS workaround. Then, ”#TwitterisblockedinTurkey” became a globally trending topic on Twitter. Into the night, usage of Google’s free DNS service exploded to circumvent the blockage of Twitter’s domain. Now, social media analysis firms Brandwatch and We Are Social report that Turkish tweets last night and this morning are up by a massive 138 percent…
…Turkish users collectively tweeted 2.5 million times since the ban went into effect, potentially “setting new records for Twitter use in the country,” according to a different study reported by the Guardian.

As Zeynep Tufekci explains, people in Turkey “banned the ban” by sharing tips on using proxies and adjusting DNS settings to get around government blocking:

By the end of the evening, I repeated the same line in interviews and also on Twitter: the only people “banned” from Twitter are pro-government supporters not wanting to openly circumvent. But then even some of them started popping up, arguing the ban must be a mistake or a devious plot by the opponents in the judiciary where they had been battling a faction. It was 3 am in Turkey and it seemed that many people on my Twitter list, who normally would be asleep by then, were awake, rejoicing in the freedom they’d clutched. They were not going to let go. Jokes were proliferating about the weakness of the ban, the fact that pro-government supporters had mostly decided to stay away, and the fact that the prolific Tweeter and mayor of Ankara from the ruling party had not been able to resist the temptation. He had circumvented.

Image: A woman paints Google’s Public DNS on her body, a method being used to get around Turkey’s Twitter ban, via @_cypherpunks_. Related, graffiti in Turkey is appearing that promotes the same.  

futurejournalismproject:

As Turkey Bans Twitter, Twitter Use Surges

Turkey banned Twitter Thursday night because of “biases" and "systematic character assassinations" it says take place on the network. Namely, that people are sharing audio recordings and other evidence of alleged mass corruption in the Erdogan government.

Despite the ban, or maybe because of it, Twitter use within Turkey just skyrocketed. Via Venture Beat:

After banning Twitter last night, the actions of Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan have failed spectacularly.

Immediately following Turkey’s ban, Twitter issued an SMS workaround. Then, ”#TwitterisblockedinTurkey” became a globally trending topic on Twitter. Into the night, usage of Google’s free DNS service exploded to circumvent the blockage of Twitter’s domain. Now, social media analysis firms Brandwatch and We Are Social report that Turkish tweets last night and this morning are up by a massive 138 percent…

…Turkish users collectively tweeted 2.5 million times since the ban went into effect, potentially “setting new records for Twitter use in the country,” according to a different study reported by the Guardian.

As Zeynep Tufekci explains, people in Turkey “banned the ban” by sharing tips on using proxies and adjusting DNS settings to get around government blocking:

By the end of the evening, I repeated the same line in interviews and also on Twitter: the only people “banned” from Twitter are pro-government supporters not wanting to openly circumvent. But then even some of them started popping up, arguing the ban must be a mistake or a devious plot by the opponents in the judiciary where they had been battling a faction. It was 3 am in Turkey and it seemed that many people on my Twitter list, who normally would be asleep by then, were awake, rejoicing in the freedom they’d clutched. They were not going to let go. Jokes were proliferating about the weakness of the ban, the fact that pro-government supporters had mostly decided to stay away, and the fact that the prolific Tweeter and mayor of Ankara from the ruling party had not been able to resist the temptation. He had circumvented.

Image: A woman paints Google’s Public DNS on her body, a method being used to get around Turkey’s Twitter ban, via @_cypherpunks_. Related, graffiti in Turkey is appearing that promotes the same.  

About A Sellout's Samizdat

My journalism career sucked, and that ship's headed for the deep anyway, so I sold out. My corporate job is a joke by comparison, but it's fun in many ways to be a drone to capitalism. Here's my story of what it's like to be a sellout - published in modern-day Soviet samizdat style. If my boss knew, I'd get sent to Siberia. And while I'm at it, why not poke fun at the dumb behavior of my former tribe?


Ask me anything How Did You Sell Out With Style?

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